Former Astros GM Jeff Luhnow sues team, claims he was scapegoated

MLB Houston

HOUSTON (KETK) – Ex-Houston Astros General Manager Jeff Luhnow is suing the organization, saying that he was the scapegoat over the infamous sign-stealing scheme that marred the team’s recent success.

In an exclusive interview with our sister station KPRC back in October, Luhnow said that most of those involved with the scandal are still with the team. The lawsuit also states this and called MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred’s organization “deeply flawed.”

“The Commissioner struck a deal with Crane to make Luhnow the scapegoat of the cheating scandal while absolving Crane, the players, and others of responsibility. The Commissioner’s report concluded that ‘Luhnow neither devised nor actively directed the efforts of the replay review room staff to decode signs in 2017 or 2018.’ Even so, the Commissioner held Luhnow ‘personally accountable for the conduct of his club’ irrespective of whether Luhnow knew about the Astros’ sign-stealing schemes, and suspended him for the 2020 season.”

Also mentioned are 22,000 text messages sent or received by Tom Koch-Weser, the team’s director of Advance Information, and who Luhnow called the ringleader of the scheme.

“Significantly, the Commissioner also had access to—but apparently did not review and conveniently failed to reference in his report—more than 22,000 text and chat messages sent or received by Tom Koch-Weser, the ringleader of the Astros’ sign-stealing schemes,” the lawsuit revealed. 

Luhnow is seeking more than $1 million in monetary relief, says that the Astros had no cause to fire him, and demanded a jury trial in Harris County.

This is a developing story. KETK News will update this story as more information becomes available.

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